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Some manga collecting thoughts, and Comic Book Store Tie-in.

March 22, 2012 Leave a comment

I just saw this on Johanna’s website who in turn got it from ICV2, and decided to elaborate more on my thoughts of it over here.. based on my own experiences as a manga consumer. This post is going to filled with some of my running ideas, as I elaborate on my comments over at Johanna’s website, which is running the Jiro Taniguchi MMF this week.

When manga consumers want “unworkable or selfishly cheap” ideas that Comic book stores can’t fulfill, then it is chalked up as a lost cause by both the comic book stores, and the manga consumers themselves. We would never see the glass cases, filled with limited or out of print goods, because:

  1. We’re not Japan.
  2. The people who purchased those out of print goods would hold onto it (in their own glass cases no less).
  3. It probably gets thrown into the trash.
  4. The value of a title gets assessed differently.
  5. English manga industry is not as established as the Japan.

In all aspects, manga is a printed paper good, so imagine how much newspapers are thrown out every year. What is the value of a manga? I sell back my manga at lower than retail prices to BookOff or when-they’ll-take-it-Strand. Many of the manga I sell are out of print works. I still see plenty of books gracing the shelves of Bookoff by the way. If there was were an available English copy… what value of that book is sold at?

There is the generous option of giving it to friends, or even donating it to the library, where most probably it would be sold at book sales of their own.

What type of limited goods are there? An autograph maybe? There are glass cases in Japanese bookstores like Mandarake, filled with out of print or rare products, all available for a price. But then there are also chances that these goods become garbage at homes. The life spans of paper goods are not going to be forever, and the value is in the information themselves.

Comic bookstores like Japanese bookstores, understand the marketing value of products. It is a very short life span. They rapidly take in and sell products. If it can help them sell a product, then they would keep a particular sign. If not then, what’s the use of keeping it? (There’s a product line of One Piece American produced action figures at Kinokuniya, I wonder how long is it going to be there before it gets sold or moves somewhere else in the store.) To amass a collection that is a shrine of sorts, is a consumers or museum’s own assessment on what to keep or preserve.

Categories: Responses Tags:

Awareness of news on Japan..what news is fit to print?

March 13, 2011 2 comments

With the news happening in Japan, I have definitely relied more on Twitter to provide me with news of what has been happening. Western media are at the moment, days late. So Japan is currently operating at normal schedule at the moment. However, with the boom of the internet, and social media.. what an elusive rush that being aware of news and the need to talk about it… can probably bring in a Trojian Horse scenario. This phrase usage is in relation to Homer’s story, not the computer scenario.

I have been mostly rt-ing on the basics a basics of being aware of things occurring, in Japan. Commends to Twitter.com to actually still be able to run like this. Still though, statistics are not settled down as of yet, and warnings are still in effect. Tsunami warnings have been lifted.

I spoke with a friend in Japan, and there are several things to be mindful of, dealing with Twitter.

  • Don’t panic.
  • Stop rt-ing old/dated news.. since with the more people, there can be more unnecessary panic.
  • Don’t spread false news, unless it is confirmed by reputable sources.

I have been mostly watching NHK World and Yokoso via UStream, so right now Tokyo is trying to maintain normal lives, and donations can be made through a variety of sources. At this time, America has sent a large ship, and this military operation is called Operation Tomodachi. It is definitely important to be aware, but to also be aware that continually surrounding yourself with this type of news is not a positive experience.

Please don’t call the affected areas, since phone communication is very tied up. If you do need to be aware of a Japanese Earthquake/Tsunami news, consult here, and possibly as a source of seeking information on foreigners living/working in Japan, here.

Categories: News, Twitter Tags:

Twitter Follow Friday. ^_^

October 18, 2010 Leave a comment

I am piggy backing on @mbeasi‘s nifty blogging things at this moment. The post is quite late… >_<  So I am going to do a personal roll call for people’s tweets that has recently within the past two months led me to actually go and learn something more about a personalized favorite subject. Whether it is in Japanese culture relevancy, or manga or just all around coolness factor, as often reading these Tweets can perk up a day on the net.

@michaelpinto – He tweets with categories that disseminates Twitter even more into richer metadata. There’s not a lot of subjects I can really gleam from fanboy.com, but on the occasional posting about these lesser known Japanese works, technology and gadget news. I find myself sometimes mentally fangirling. ^_^

@hisuiRT– Sarcastic and witty, hisuiRT has became a pretty nifty person to speak to on Twitter. He tweets a lot about specific anime/manga/hobby topics. What I definitely like from his tweets is the personality and probably multiple-facted quirks you can get him to talk to you about. He is one half of Reverse Thieves and RT are running a anime Secret Santa at this moment.

@debaoki -Continually tweeting about new manga, or her wine trips, she is often the person to definitely retweet if you wan to learn about manga news/industry in the United States. She is immensely knowledgeable about gathering a niche focus group together, and continually I see her as a center person to refer back on. She writes for About.com.

@edsizemore -As a networking strong presence for specific manga/comic reviews, that he champions. There is his tweets, and podcasts. His tweets are often insightful, and sometimes though provoking. I look forward to reading his varied reactions to graphic novels. He writes as part of Comics worth reading.

@yuricon – She’s always mentions various topics that are either on industry, social media, graphic novels news, or LGBT rights relevance. I find her tweets educational and definitely re-tweet-able. She writes pro-yuri and female liberalism blog entries on Okazu.

So reading this list, you may or may not follow these people… but since they tweet consistently and frequently on the net on topics that I find quite interesting, I definitely find their tweets consistently something to follow up on.

Categories: Responses, Twitter Tags:

Following up on Mushishi from April’s MMF…

May 4, 2010 Leave a comment

So April is over, and May has happened. I skipped out on Sakura Matsuri this year at Brooklyn Botanical Garden, saw some shots that my friend took.

I recently participated on a podcast, Ed Sizemore’s follow up to his round up of entries about Mushishi, the manga, including mine. This podcast is the second time I actually was on one. The first one did not make it past the cutting board, and now this one. I am going to be calling the kettle black if I don’t confess that I didn’t hear myself go off on a tangent, that people didn’t understand, and for that I profess my sincere apologies. Thanks to Ed for giving that opportunity.

One of these days need to finalize my thoughts about Mushishi, but all experiences surrounding this title are good ones. I have to confess that I haven’t read Mushishi since January, and I was seriously thinking about the anime while I was doing the podcast. I kept on thinking of remarks, and then my mind wandered, and I was like, what was my train of thought again?

I can only say if anyone wants to hear me on podcast, I will try my best. Since all I can say is practice makes perfect.

Categories: Responses Tags:

Criticism on blogging and panels.>_<

January 18, 2010 2 comments

Actually this entire post came out from my other post on Manga reviewing tips. I was busy compiling the tweets together, when I spent an hour just peering through the tweets. By the time I was able to put out the other post. I realize that the criticism aspect I was cutting and pasting, was way more off tangent than what I was even reporting on the first place. So now  the time has past, and since I believe that twitter is pretty much a tangible medium, I figure I’ll record it here as well.

This is a discussion regarding about negative aspects of blogging panels/RT at anime conventions, which I hope will improve more and more with the various bloggers and interests. I feel kinda obligated to post on this, since this was the only blogging panel that I was found myself briefly at. In my recollection there are two other anime blogging panels I have missed. The Anime Next 2009 and the New York Anime Festival 2008.

For the 2009 NYAF blogging panel, I didn’t know most people on the panel. I realized afterward, that a majority of these bloggers on this panel were podcasters, which is a medium I wasn’t as familiar with. I had prior conversation with other bloggers, and the tone was a matter of fact attitude. Would this panel succeed or not?  Ever since I started to attend conventions since 2006, I have been trying to go to various writing panels, but because of timing and hours I have never attended any of them. There is also just way too many bloggers on the internet.

Blogging is a medium where it is knocking down the traditional journalism perspective and that is a grain of salt for a lot of people. But I have made friends outside of these panels. So there is a community and niche in who enjoys what. Deb, Emi, and mbeasi made interesting points here.

Deb: @MagicalEmi that’s kind of my worry too. 😉 bloggers enjoy each other’s company, but i don’t think we have “fans” per se to warrant a panel

MagicalEmi:  @debaoki I think a panel w/ you guys would be 1 person saying something, and everyone nodding and agreeing

Deb: @MagicalEmi we did a blogger panel at NYAF, and i thought it was kind of… well, self-serving.

They needed a panel.. so it turned into a Round Table. That should have gone around like a hot potato instead.  Ahh well it did, but let’s just say that some people talked more.

For those who would be interested in seeing or remembering a video of this panel, here’s Moritheil’s video covering.

MagicalEmi: @debaoki y’all seem to have similar opinions, no one here (that I can see) seems to disagree enough to spark a lively debate/discussion

MagicalEmi: @debaoki Yah that might make it more interesting, and less preaching to the choir XD

mbeasi: @debaoki @MagicalEmi Well, I thought the real problem with that panel is that there was almost no discussion of *blogging*.

MagicalEmi: @mbeasi I’d be more interested in the technical aspect ^^ What blogging platform they use, templates, maintaining update schedules, etc

mbeasi: @MagicalEmi I actually think the technical aspect is not too far removed from the rest. One informs the other, in a lot of respects.

For bloggers knowing technical skills is an advantage. Now if you can meld writers and techies. That would be a great thing to have, otherwise pay someone else for that skill set then.

Deb: @mbeasi @magicalemi the problem is when we, as bloggers, start thinking we are “celebrities” of some sort. we are not.

Deb: @MagicalEmi @mbeasi yep. too much of that last blogger panel was about ‘who are you & what’s your otaku cred?’

Deb: @mbeasi well, that’s kinda why i was thinking it’d be better to just have a blogger/press mixer instead of a panel.

Deb: @mbeasi @magicalemi but that comes from not realizing who your potential audience for such a panel might be.

Deb: @mbeasi @magicalemi if it was promoted as a blogger panel by bloggers for bloggers, then the focus/questions would be different.

Deb: @mbeasi @magicalemi instead, the panel was more positioned as “meet the people that you read! they are cool!” — which made it chatter-y.

Deb: @mbeasi @johannadc @magicalemi yes — and that’s why such a panel needs to be more focused in that way than just “meet popular bloggers”

Deb: @palmie @mbeasi yep. blogging works best when you are giving as well as getting comments – you become part of the discussion.

I am going to conclude with this vein with a possible panel that Edsizemore and Moritheil might do in the future. So let’s see how the next convention blogging panel will go or not.

Would there be one?

Also bias on this post is that it is talking in regards to the East Coast bloggers. There are times where I do wish that I was able to go over to the West coast to meet the west coast bloggers, but since it is not possible at this moment. Shall have to see in the future then.

Categories: Twitter

Manga Reviewing Tip List.. via Twitter… Part 2

January 17, 2010 2 comments

Well this is so soon after my first posting on it, with how fast Twitter moved. The tip list increased…. since this is great as a reminder for self, and maybe others.. I decided to continue to put off that one more draft until a little bit…and… the list has so far gotten up to about 19 tips..  ^_^

So let’s go again..

Deb: manga reviewing tip #9 fr. @LostPhrack: read outside your comfort zone to widen your horizons, consider why you like/don’t like diff. things

Deb: manga reviewing tip #10 fr. @hermanos: “be able to talk about what works and what doesn’t in the art, and (hopefully) explain why.”

There is seems to be some discrepancy in the numbering of 10.. so taking the liberty to just correct and alter this numbering. Then it corrects itself in the tweets.

Deb: manga reviewing tip #11 fr @ProfessorBlind: “a good review scratches an itch. Something about the title must motivate you almost an involuntary response.” (This tip had two tweets – Tweet 1, Tweet 2)

Deb: manga reviewing tip #12: if a first volume doesn’t move you, try waiting for the second before reviewing. it might change your mind.

Deb: manga reviewing tip #13 fr. @hisuiRT “the best reviews look at manga in pieces (as single volumes) & holistically (as a series) you should mention all of the indivual pieces & how they work alone as well as a whole.” (This tip also had two tweets –Tweet 1, Tweet 2)

Deb: manga reviewing tip #14 fr. @jeridel: “reviews that are entertaining, & read characters/stories as metaphors are the most memorable.”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #15 fr. @michaelpinto “don’t be afraid to think big and reference art history, classic literature & asian studies”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #16 fr @BradleyCMeek (kinda) “learn to write by reading all kinds of books. take writing classes to hone your skills”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #17 fr. @Quarteni “include info about the creator, their past titles or similar titles & the intended audience in US/JP”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #18: if you use a grading/number scale, establish what each grade/score means, so you can apply it consistently. [Then there was a corollary] If you give everything a high grade, then you’ve rendered your grading system meaningless.

Deb: manga reviewing tip #19 fr @agdeeds “Don’t write assuming I’m a return reader. It doesn’t help me decide about what you’re reviewing now.”

Yep, so with these wisdom and collaborate learning.. it is great to think about what further discussion can come of this list.

Categories: Twitter Tags: ,

Manga Reviewing Tip List.. via Twitter…

January 16, 2010 4 comments

As I read through other people’s tweets, one of my regular tweet follower is About.com’s Manga Guide Deb Aoki among other manga blogger tweeters (yuricon, magicalemi, ed, per, tiamat’s etc.)

Recently Deb posted on Twitter, an umbrella and discussion posing on what tips are there.  So the focus, of that grain of thought is audience and seeing who is receptive to what you are talking about.

Right now I figure it would be better to list down what Deb Aoki and other relevant tweets actually said, before it gets lost in the crush that is Twitter-verse. This brings to my mind on how tangible new media is, so there should be feedback and discussion on what is tangible like Twitter tweets. Slight warning since I believe the main conversation began a while ago, so I will be listing tweets out of order, but in a relatively readable, recordable format.

I agree with this tweet by @mbeasi earlier, since I usually do the same thing.

Mbeasi: @manga_critic @debaoki @danielle_leigh1 I think the reason having so many sites/reviewers covering the same books is valuable is that…

Mbeasi: @manga_critic @debaoki @danielle_leigh1 there is so much range in style & focus. That’s why I’ll read 5-10 reviews of the same book, y’know?

This part of dialogue began or continued the vein of what Deb’s purpose is as an editor/reader.

Deb: @mbeasi @manga_critic @danielle_leigh now that i’m editing other ppl’s reviews, i ended up asking myself, ‘what makes a review good?’

Deb: @mbeasi @manga_critic @danielle_leigh i find i enjoy reading reviews by writers who inject some personality, unique POV in their prose.

Deb: RT @johannadc “I summed mine up in How to Review post: http://bit.ly/5qfvl7
(I think this is relevant to @edsizemore, since it is from Comics Worth to be Read)

This is a list of what Deb compiled, and with some suggestions from the rest of us tweeters.

Deb: manga reviewing tip #1: “Did you like it or not? I should have some idea whether it’s worth buying or not after reading your review”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #2: “grab my attention in the first 1-2 paragraphs & give me a reason to keep reading, or I’ll just click away.”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #3: “write like you’re having fun, not writing a term paper.”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #4: “yes, by all means tell me what the story is about — but can you skip the rehash of the entire book?”

Then a pause, while Deb calls for others to chime in.

Deb: i gave 4 “manga reviewing tips” earlier today. anyone else want to share theirs? (to find ’em, search for “manga reviewing tip”) via Twitter Search.

Then back to the list….

Deb: manga reviewing tip #5 from @animevice: you are giving your informed opinion, not coming to a scientific conclusion everyone must agree with.

Deb: manga reviewing tip #6 from @aicnanime: “you don’t need to talk to it, but know manga’s context; its home anthology specifically.”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #7 from @animemiz: “Suggest read-alikes in your review. What type of reader are you?”

Deb: manga reviewing tip #8: remember that not all of your readers may be aware of Japanese/geek lingo, acronyms & in-jokes

So yes this is a continuing list mentions this –

Edsizemore: @debaoki Seriously Deb, you need to put these all together as a post and expand on each a little more. This is too good to leave to twitter.

Before it gets too late, I’ll leave this with Edsizemore’s amusing tweets on the machine that is Twitter.

Edsizemore: @debaoki You could have fooled us. I would hate for all this wisdom to get lost in the twitter archives.

Categories: Twitter Tags: ,
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